Facet Joint Injections

Facet joint injection is a minimally invasive treatment option that can help alleviate chronic pain in the neck, back, and other areas of the body. This procedure involves injecting a steroid medication and local anesthetic directly into the small joints located between the vertebrae of the spine, called facet joints. These joints are responsible for controlling the movement of the spine and can become inflamed or damaged due to injury, arthritis, or wear and tear. 

Facet Joint Syndrome is a common cause of Back Pain

Facet joint syndrome is a common cause of spinal pain that often goes untreated. This condition occurs when the facet joints, which are responsible for spinal movement and stability, become inflamed or arthritic. Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks are a proven solution for relieving this type of pain. At the London Interventional Clinic, our team led by our Medical Director Dr Stephen Humble, offers Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks to help diagnose and treat patients with intractable back pain.

London Interventional Clinic

Physical Therapy for Rehabilitation and Strength

After the procedure, physical therapy is usually recommended to help patients rehabilitate and strengthen the muscles around the spine. This helps to ensure that the treatment is successful and that the patient experiences long-term relief from spinal pain.

Facet joint syndrome is a common cause of spinal pain that often goes untreated. Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks are a safe, reliable, and effective solution for relieving this type of pain. The procedure is performed as an outpatient procedure and with image guidance, making it a minimally invasive and convenient solution for patients. Physical therapy is also recommended to help patients recover and strengthen their muscles, ensuring long-term relief from spinal pain. Our team led by Dr Humble is dedicated to providing the highest quality care to help relieve pain and improve the quality of life for our patients.

What are Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks?

Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks are nerve blocks that target the nerve that supplies the facet joint. By blocking this nerve with local anaesthetic, the spinal pain can be relieved. The procedure not only confirms the diagnosis of facet joint syndrome but also enables more definitive treatment if required. This, in turn, helps avoid further unnecessary investigations and surgery.

A Gold Standard for Diagnosing Facet Joint Syndrome

Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks are considered the gold standard for diagnosing facet joint syndrome. They are a safe and reliable way to confirm the diagnosis, allowing for more accurate and effective treatment. This is a significant advantage for patients, who can receive proper care for their condition without the need for further testing or unnecessary interventions (2009).

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A Therapeutic Solution

Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks are not only diagnostic but therapeutic in their own right. If the blocks provide temporary relief but only for a short period, radiofrequency treatment can be used to treat the syndrome over a longer time. This treatment is performed in an outpatient theatre, meaning that patients can walk in and out within a few hours, minimizing the time away from work and home.

Minimal Time and Maximum Safety

Facet Joint Medial Branch Blocks are performed with image guidance to ensure safety and accuracy. This minimizes the risk of complications and provides patients with peace of mind. Furthermore, the procedure is performed as an outpatient procedure, meaning that there is no need for an overnight stay.

References:

 

  1. Falco et al., Systematic review of diagnostic utility and therapeutic effectiveness of cervical facet joint interventions. Pain Physician 2009 Mar-Apr;12(2):323-44.
  2. Janapala et al., Efficacy of Radiofrequency Neurotomy in Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis J Pain Res. 2021; 14: 2859–2891.
  3. Lee et al., Latest Evidence-Based Application for Radiofrequency Neurotomy (LEARN): Best Practice Guidelines from the American Society of Pain and Neuroscience (ASPN) J Pain Res. 2021; 14: 2807–2831